Tag Archives: hat

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ROBIN HOOD HAT

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One of my Burning Man camp-mates called me up and said “My production company needs a hat replicated, and we need it in two days!” and I said “OK,” and so I made a Robin Hood hat.

But maybe a little more context first? Stan Lee did a photoshoot in which he dressed up as Errol Flynn’s Robin Hood, as a promotion for World of Heroes that would be on display in ArcLight Theaters (You can see my friend Paul on the floor behind Stan in the video).

stan lee

They wanted to display some artifacts from the shoot in selected theaters, but the original hat was only a rental and could not go on tour. So it was my job to create a replica that would be on display.

Robin Hood hat, made by Julianne

I was on a serious time crunch, and the only felt I could find was nylon. I tried tinting the fabric in brown dye, which totally didn’t work. Color correction was shelved for later. As a starting point, I used this tutorial to make a sample, and tweaked the pattern from there.

In order to recreate the structure of the blocked hat, I made the hat double layered, and fused the two pieces of felt together with iron-on bonding paper. I added fabric glue to the inside of the crown as a sizing, and then gave the entire hat a wash of watered down acrylic paint to make the color more accurate.

Robin Hood hat, made by Julianne

Even though my hat was only made for display, it will probably go to Stan Lee when the campaign is over. Neato!

Robin Hood hat, made by Julianne

This project was a fun and challenging mix of sewing and craft skills. I wasn’t really sure how I would make it when I started, but I was confident every step of the way. I made the deadline, I got the check, and this project was a total success!

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FABRIC YARN baby hat

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My husband’s cousin’s baby is such a sweetheart, and I love making little presents for him (and all my friend’s kiddos!). His name is Kekoa, he’s 2 years old, and tons of fun.

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The ribbing is p1, k1 through the back loop (which is abbreviated as ktbl, which I pronounce as “k-table”). This twists the knit stitch, making the ribbing super stretchy and very neat. I use this for all my ribbing now!

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I made this fabric yarn as a proof of concept. I loved working with it, and the way it turned out. I may use the rest of this white and gray to make yet another shopping bag (don’t worry, I’m giving most of them away. I don’t shop that much!).

making fabric yarn, made by Julianne

making fabric yarn, made by Julianne making fabric yarn, made by Julianne

I used a couple 1yd remnants of a tissue-weight jersey with high lycra content, and serged the pieces into a tube to cut a continuous strip. I stretched the strip while winding it into a ball, so the fabric curled onto itself into tube. The resulting knit fabric has a lot of body, but is also very stretchy.

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Fabric yarn is an inexpensive, easy way to experiment with a different type of fiber, and I definitely recommend it!

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ANEMONE HAT

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Searching through Ravelry one morning, I was instantly smitten by this charmingly eccentric hat: Cat Bordhi’s Anemone. What’s not to love? There’s the elegant twist of the moebius brim, the wonderful bunching of rows of knits and purls, and of course, all those fabulous tendrils springing out from my head like a million brilliant ideas.

yellow anemone hat, made by Julianne

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This picture is quickly becoming my favorite picture of me. We took these pictures at Alcatraz a couple weeks ago. My dad and stepmom were supposed to fly in from Massachusetts but had to cancel at the last minute, so we went on the tour for them.

yellow anemone hat yellow anemone hat

I love the moebius brim! You wind up knitting it from the center row out, so that instead of it growing from top to bottom, the rows are added to the top and bottom. It was a little tricky, but Cat Bordhi’s tutorials were clear to follow.

I have a gorgeous fuchsia yarn that I think would be great for this design, except it’s not superwash (the hat should be washed in a machine to plump up the tendrils). So I wanted my first rendition to follow the directions, which is laughable in retrospect and should have been obvious up front. I know who I am, and someone who follows directions when making something is not my style.

anemone hat, made by Julianne future anemone yarn, made by Julianne

I love the rainbow slub of this chunky yarn, and it matches a scarf I bought in Florence in 2005. The yarn came from Micheal’s, and I believe it was on sale. I kept the sleeve while I was knitting and threw it away without a single thought about blog posting. I do remember that the colorway was “Tempo” and it’s a wool/ploy blend (I think 50/50). However, it’s much thicker than the recommended worsted weight, some sort of chunk, but for some reason I didn’t think that would be a problem, so I got to work on the brim.

mobius attempt, made by Julianne yellow anemone hat, made by Julianne

Sans gauge swatch, my first attempt was way too big. Two guage swatches later, I realized that even the tiniest needles weren’t going to make this yarn worsted weight, and so using US#5 needles I just made the “baby” size. I wound up doing just one series of the tendrils (in each spot in the row) before beginning my increases. It fits perfectly!

yellow anemone hat, made by Julianne

My tendrils seem to curl a little bit, which I think is cute and due to either the uneven thickness of the yarn or unevenness of my twisting. With this yarn at least, I didn’t notice any difference after washing. I’m definitely looking forward to making this hat again with recommended yarn, but first I have two other yarns in my stash that need to be worked up!

I love this hat and wear it whenever its chilly at night in LA. I tend to get a lot of stares when I wear this hat out, which can be disorienting, because they seem to be of the “what the fuck is that hat?” nature. Whatevs.

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BEEHIVE TURBAN

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As soon as I started knitting, I was most excited about knitting things to wear at Burning Man. I love showcasing my sewing projects on the playa, and it’s great to have a new medium to get creative with. Of course I’m wearing this turban off the playa too!

I’m so pleased and proud of how this hat turned out. It’s actually my fifth hat, and used the smallest needles yet (and therefore had more stitches than any other project).

knit beehive turban, Made by Julianne knit beehive turban, Made by Julianne knit beehive turban, Made by Julianne

knit beehive turban, Made by Julianne

The Striped Beehive Turban was designed by Christine Grant. I’m still new to reading knitting patterns, but hers was easy to follow. I knit the ribbing with 72 stitches, then increased to 84 for the orange and blue bands, and it fits me perfectly. I chose to gather from the radius and covered my awful seaming, and wrapped those stitches in yarn (from the side, it reminds me of an angler fish).

knit beehive turban, Made by Julianne knit beehive turban, Made by Julianne

I picked Sheep-ish yarn for its bright colors and soft feel, plus it was on sale at Joann. The yarn is pretty loosely twisted, so I’d be afraid of pilling if I were to use this yarn for a garment. Also, I kept getting my wonderfully pointy new needles stuck in the yarn. So while I might not buy this yarn again, I think it was a great choice for this project.

knit beehive turban, Made by Julianne

My friend Shing made this clay button as a wedding gift (she also made the rocket pendants on our chandelier). It perfectly matches all the colors, although it didn’t occur to me to pair it with my turban until it was complete.

knit beehive turban, Made by Julianne

I have enough of these yarns to make a second turban, switching the colors around, and I’m thinking about making it inside out, with 4 purled rows and 10 knit rows (the reverse of the pattern). I’ll also modify the pattern to knit in the round, because I kind of like the jogged stripes, in a brushstrokes way [it reveals the technique and the hand of the artist– so glad I have a degree in art history!].

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FIRST KNIT HATS

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I’m pretty pleased with my first ever knitting project. It’s based on this very basic hat, but I wasn’t paying attention, missed a few steps, and decided to just continue with my own design. I’m terrible at following other people’s patterns!

hat knit in the round, Made by Julianne hat knit in the round, Made by Julianne

I used Lion Thick & Quick, in a 80% acryllic 20% wool blend. It was really nice to work with as a first project: the yarn held together well, it was easy to see my stitches, and the thick yarn made this hat a fast project! Plus I do love the color, and it goes very well with all my other yellow hats.

I used #10 bamboo circular needles, and then waited almost a month to sew the side seam! And I did such a horrible job of it! I know that I should learn how to do a decent job at a side seam, but in the meantime I think I’ll stick to knitting in the round.

Since I’d bought two hanks of the yarn, I decided to make a second hat (and I think I have enough left to make a third!). My second hat was knit in the round on the same needles, and I really loved the process. Near the top, I switched to DPN, which was challenging but kinda fun. I’m looking forward to trying out magic loop on my next circular hat!

hat knit in the round, Made by Julianne hat knit in the round, Made by Julianne hat knit in the round, Made by Julianne

For this hat I was able to adhere to the pattern (mostly), but the hat’s too short for my head! I have some crochet needles somewhere, and once I find them I will add a band to the bottom of this hat… or maybe give it as a gift? To a child? In the meantime I’ve been wearing it in my apartment, because it’s been freezing in Los Angeles!

I’ve wanted to knit for years, but never gave myself the time and space to concentrate on it. There were a few aborted attempts that didn’t break my spirit, but let me know that I wasn’t ready yet. One morning I woke up, spent a few minutes on Knitting Help, and spent the rest of the day gleefully knitting swatch after swatch.

Based on all the handwork I do, I knew that I could knit. And it’s pretty easy, and I’m really excited about it. I’m already working on my fourth hat, on #4 needles, with stripes, and ribbing, and I can’t wait!

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ANIMALPARTY HOODS

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Every year the Jack Rabbit Speaks, the Burning Man newsletter, puts out a resource edition, in which they list suppliers of all sorts of playa necessities. As I was filling out the form to get Fabric Planet listed it occurred to me that I could be listed myself, as a costumer. With a little over a week before the application deadline, I’ve gone into high gear cranking out all these designs I’ve had in my head over the past few months, and the first one to come out was the animal hood.

THESE ARE ALL FOR SALE IN MY ETSY SHOP–YOU SHOULD BUY ONE NOW.

silky snow cat lame zebracat pink furrr hood

velvet zebra hood zebracat fleece hood silky snow cat

These hoods are great with any outfit, from spicing up a bikini (or your fabulous naked self, not pictured) or keeping your noggin warm during your late night playa adventures. They are made out of a wide variety of fabrics, from velvet, fleece, faux fur, jersey, and lame, all the way to cotton for some light-weight day time shenanigans.

velvet zebra hood silky snow cat zebracat fleece hood

They can even be turned inside out for a different look that’s only slightly more toned down.

I developed the pattern myself. It’s pretty straightforward and didn’t have to go through too many drafts. There are bits and pieces inspired by various projects I’ve worked over the past few months, and my favorite part is the cascading ruffle down the front. This can be tied in a bow, tossed over the shoulders, or left to just hang down, and any way it looks awesome.

silky snow cat velvet zebra hood pink furrr hood

I’m trying to really mix and match with the fabric pairings with the idea that no combination will be repeated, unless requested by a customer. I have a tendency to use the last 3 yards of a fabric so that I’m always making end of the run garments, and a few of these are made from remnant materials so that they are ultra one-of-a-kind. This winds up taking more time per-piece than if I made 10 of each combo, but I think the fun and spontaneity of these hoods is worth the work.

zebracat fleece hood velvet zebra hood

made by julianne tags! Although I can make just about any style of ear, so far these are all kitties. I feel like the pointed ear is feisty, and it can go with other animals (fox, cat, kitten, tiger…). Plus, who wouldn’t want to draw whiskers on their cheeks and meow for a saucer of almond milk all night?!

I ordered woven labels and they arrived just in time for this big project. If I had known what a rush I’d get from seeing these sewn into the things I make I would have ordered them a long time ago! And I think they really do give these hoods an official look.

Check out what hoods I have available in my Etsy shop. I’ll be making lots more hoods this weekend (my life is covered in fur). Also, I can also do custom orders for specific fabrics!

pink furrr hood

Thanks be to Jason for the fantastic photoshoot, great direction, and silly hijinx in the alley!

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