Categotry Archives: handmade




I love my Ravey Crockett hat so much that I decided the idea deserved a second round of design.

For Ravey Crockett 2.0, I used a fur that’s more fluffy than hairy. I think it’s a more surreal texture, more like a Muppet and less like a pink version of an earth creature.  Ravey Crockett hat, made by Julianne

This new version has ambiguous ears! The hat can be worn as part of a cat costume, or it can compliment a unique character. Ravey Crockett hat, made by Julianne

But perhaps the most exciting change is meant to be invisible! I inserted an invisible zipper in the lining, which opens up to a secret stash pocket. The pocket is about 4×6″, big enough for a phone, some money, some little baggies filled with treasure… When closed, the zipper pull is in the corner of the lining, so not too obvious for any nosy searches.

There’s a loop at the base of the tail so that the hat can be clipped to a utility belt. The hat is fun to wear and secure to not wear. Ravey Crockett hat, made by Julianne Ravey Crockett hat, made by Julianne

It’s obviously the perfect hat for Burning Man, so I think you should buy one now!

Ravey Crockett hat, made by Julianne




My computer has recently revived from a 3 week hiatus, and yet I’m still just using an old post. Haven’t got quite everything back up and running, and the laptop was really just an excuse to not blog. Maybe I’ll write about it later, but does anyone really care? Long story short: I’m busy sewing all day, working really hard, and also prioritizing my time off. I haven’t really done any personal sewing, and I’m waiting for photos on several large projects for clients. Theoretically I’ll be able to post every day in May.

So in the meantime here’s a post that’s all about eventually getting things done. Pictures were taken in July 2014, when I had an incredibly short cut and was still deep in platinum mania.


Happy birthday to meee… from 2013. I bought this fabric as a birthday gift to myself, but between other projects and design uncertainty, wasn’t able to sew it up until 14 months later. Luckily it was worth the wait!

yellow floral shift dress, made by Julianne

The yellow floral poplin in from the Lisette line at Joann. I immediately fell in love with the color combination and the paisley-inspired print. But it was that print that got me turned around. Brightly colored flowers… would that be too juvenile? I hate the idea of being ‘cute’ or saccharine, and so the fabric was folded and left in my cabinet…

Would I use a Laurel-esque shift pattern (this was right around the time that design was sweeping the blogosphere)? What about a vintage sleeveless dress? Maybe I should copy a 2005 H&M shirt dress I still wear: even with the heart print and slightly puffed sleeves, the sleek seams and short hem made me feel powerful.

yellow floral shift dress, made by Julianne

In the end, I combined all these elements. I made a complete pattern of the H&M dress, but eliminated the sleeves and collar. I used a placket inspired from my vintage pattern, though I constructed this one myself. I copied Laurel’s clean neckline, and from there added my own details.

yellow floral shift dress, made by Julianne The raw edges are serged and topstitched. The neckline and arm holes are bound with self-made bias tape, which I sewed on the front using my machine, and then whip stitched the inside and back. yellow floral shift dress, made by Julianne

yellow floral shift dress, made by Julianne

yellow floral shift dress, made by Julianne

I feel like the coral binding creates a neat outline for the wild print. The mustard thread for the buttonholes doesn’t actually match any of the 7 colors of the fabric, but it still felt like the right choice. And the gold shank buttons… somehow, I didn’t even consider that option as I imagined the perfect buttons, but they jumped out at me as I was browsing the Dill racks.

yellow floral shift dress, made by Julianne

It’s been a great summer dress so far, and of course it will do well in cooler temperatures with a cardigan and leggings.

yellow floral shift dress, made by Julianne

I already bought fabric for this year’s birthday dress. I’m not sure if I’ll have it done in time (3 weeks!) and I’m not even sure what design I will use. Perhaps I’ll make a blog post all about that… I should have it published in about 4 months!




I made this dress for my birthday this year, and it was perfect for my bayou birthday party.

yellow zigzag dress, made by Julianne

The dress had to be lined, and since the seams would have been slightly visible through the white areas of the print, I felt like interlining was the only option. Well, sewing two layers of swishy fabric together while keeping the print centered and the grainlines even can be a pain in the ass. In the end it turned out well, but it was a process to get there.

It’s a very basic shift (or sheath) dress. Easy to make, versatile to wear, and simple design lines that allow the fabric to take center stage. I have a few fabulous fabrics that have been patiently waiting in my sewing cabinet, and I think this new pattern will match perfectly.

yellow zigzag dress, made by Julianne

I bought the yellow printed rayon as soon as it came in the door at Fabric Planet Downtown for $3/yd. The dress is lined with a blush pink rayon, which also came via Fabric Planet (from the Venice store, and was the same price). The invisible zipper and TIffany blue lycra I used for the binding were rummaged from my fabric cabinet. Total dress cost: $12

yellow zigzag dress, made by Julianne

I just love the bright lemon yellow! The crisp chevrons are actually composed of tiny triangles. This print is hitting all my buttons.

I didn’t really think about how prone to wrinkles the finished garment would be. Not that I generally look freshly pressed, but I do like to show off my clothes to their best advantage. I must admit, I’m a little disappointed that despite the care I put into constructing the dress, it will always look a little sloppy.

yellow zigzag dress, made by Julianne

Although I’ve only worn the dress once before, the fabric is starting to pill at the underarms. It’s certainly not a disaster, just another disappointment to overcome. This dress may not have the longevity that I was looking forward to as I began to put it together.

yellow zigzag dress, made by julianne

I drafted the basic shift pattern with a muslin (and 2 sleeves with different cap heights!), and the meticulous fitting on the muslin isn’t quite obvious in the shifty doubled rayon. Oh well, I think that attention will pay off in other iterations of the design.

yellow zigzag dress, made by Julianne yellow zigzag dress, made by Julianne
And yes, I am on Instagram now.




I promise I don’t post every single one of these! I do enjoy making them though. Bags like these are super easy to make, especially while doing something else. Because gauge doesn’t matter, I can switch between whatever needles or yarns strike my fancy. And they are useful gifts!green knit shopping bag, made by Julianne

This bag uses more chunky acrylic yarn for the bottom, and leftover worsted acrylic for the body. I’m slowly making my way through my stash!

green knit shopping bag, made by JulianneKeep reading for instructions to knit your own.

Continue reading →

I wanted to use a concentric garter stitch for the bottom of the bag, and this is basically how I did it:

CO 6 stitches, placing a marker between each stitch, with a special marker for the beginning of round

row 1: *slip marker, increase 1 stitch, repeat from * (I used kfb, but I think this would look neat with a YO)

row 2: purl all stitches

row 3: *slip marker, work 1 increase, knit to marker, repeat from *

And then you work rounds 2 & 3 until the base is as big as you want.

I continued until I had 12 stitches between each marker, then worked a couple rounds alternating between all purls and all knit stitches without increasing. To conserve yarn when I switched to my worsted, I knit 2 rounds in the contrast color, then worked the third round as k1, k2tog. Round 4 and up was all knit.

Next time I make a bag, I will skip the k1, k2tog row, and just knit all the stitches for the body of the bag (or make the base smaller).

During my last bag, I got burned out on YO, k2tog mesh. Though I like the look, I can never get into a rhythm with that pattern. This time, I knit my worsted weight on size 10.5 (6.5 mm) needles to get an open fabric, and this project was finished in a flash!

The light green top is 4 rounds of garter stitch, and the handles are i-cord.

If anyone uses this pattern for their own bag, I’d love to see the results!





I cut the sleeves off my Galaxy dress!

sleeveless galaxy dress, made by Julianne

I have such a bad habit of cutting my sleeves and shoulders too tight! I like that slim look, but it makes the garment uncomfortable which makes it stay in my closet. Even though I knew that the sleeves weren’t working for me, I was reluctant to remove them. It meant admitting another failure, and there was no going back. But in reality, it was improving the fit of a great dress, like the ol’ caterpillar/butterfly scenario. Lately I’ve been focusing on identifying and removing roadblocks in my life, and small projects like this can really help with momentum for bigger changes.

sleeveless galaxy dress, made by Julianne

The sleeves were nice, but maybe all that cotton candy tie dye was a little overwhelming. Since the neckline of the dress is high, it’s really great to have more skin exposed, and now this dress will be even more wearable.

sleeveless galaxy dress, made by Julianne

I’ve enrolled in Craftsy’s Sew the Perfect Fit class, and eventually I will actually go through the lessons. This will be the first time in my life to have ever taken a formal-ish sewing lesson! Everything I know I picked up from my mom, and years of trial and error. Hopefully there will be properly fitted sleeves in my future! Of course, this will have to wait until after Burning Man. So many plans for September!




I don’t want to drown this blog with pictures of my Burning Man gag masks, but here are some of my favorites.

sequin zipper gag mask, made by Julianne

Burning Man is held in a desert, which is prone to dust storms, so proper face covering can greatly improve your comfort (just because you can’t see further than 30 feet doesn’t mean you don’t want to party).

neon zipper gag mask, made by Julianne

And even when the air is clear, these masks are great for freaking out the other Burners on the dance floor.

I use recycled fabrics for the bases, and pick the elastic, zipper, and threads to suit my mood. The straps are adjustable bra straps, so each mask is pretty comfortable.

zebra zipper gag mask, made by Julianne

They are all up in my Etsy shop now! [the green one sold out already!]

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